The Legislatures final budget includes $100 million for Florida Forever. Senate referrals: Community Affairs(approved 1/25); Education (approved 2/1); Rules (approved 2/10). SB 518 (Brodeur)/HB 1555 (McLain) revises state regulation of local government requirements for tree trimming, pruning, and removal by requiring an assessment by a certified arborist. HB 325 (Fischer) and SB 512 (Burgess) would have preempted to the state most regulation of vacation rentals. SB 1556 (Gruters) and HB 967 (Truenow) would direct the Department of Environmental Protection to create a best management practices (BMP) certification program for fertilizer application on golf courses in coordination with the University of Floridas Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences program. House referrals: Environment, Agriculture & Flooding Subcommittee; Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee; State Affairs. SB 1000 (Albritton) and HB 1291 (McClure) amends agricultural fertilizer regulations to define certified professionals and rate tailoring to allow producers to pick and choose different nutrient application rates. A person certified under this section is exempt from additional golf course fertilizer application testing and from local water use and fertilizer application restrictions such as fertilizer blackout periods. Senate referrals: Community Affairs (approved 1/18); Governmental Oversight and Accountability(approved 2/10); Rules (approved 2/23). It would prohibit funds being spent on agency administrative expenses. SJR 152 (Farmer) would have required a two-thirds vote of each house to preempt to the state matters of local control. 2022-189), Died in Public Integrity & Elections Committee, Local Administration & Veterans Affairs Subcommittee, Woodson. SB 904 (Farmer) and HB 807 (Rayner) would have required the Department of Agriculture to develop and adopt rules governing agricultural best management practices or other measures to reduce water pollution, and imposed penalties for failing to follow them. HB 1077 (Hunschofsky) and SB 1434 (Rodriquez) would have expanded the state requirement for sea-level rise impact studies on public projects from coastal areas to inland areas at increased risk of flooding due to sea-level rise. Enhancement credits would be defined as a standard unit of measure to represent a quantity of pollutants removed. House referrals: Environment, Agriculture, & Flooding Subcommittee; Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee; State Affairs. 2022-209), Died in Secondary Education & Career Development Subcommittee, Died in Commerce Committee; companion bill(s) passed, see CS/CS/SB 160 (Ch. Senate referrals: Environment and Natural Resources(approved 1/24); Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment, and General Government; Appropriations, House referrals: Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee (approved 2/14); Ways & Means; Appropriations. Senate referrals:Environment and Natural Resources; Regulated Industries; Rules, House referrals: Tourism, Infrastructure & Energy Subcommittee; Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee; Commerce. If this mitigation concept is a viable option, lets encourage our elected official to give it a good old fashioned test drive first in the form of five test sites that dont include any wetlands. While this bill died in the committee process, a provision in the legislatures approved budget includes a sales tax exemption for Energy Star appliances between 2022-2023, which includes energy efficient washing machines and water heaters. Senate referrals: Environment and Natural Resources, Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment and General Government and Appropriations. PASSED BY HOUSE 2/24 PASSED BY SENATE 3/2, Senate referrals: Environment and Natural Resources (approved 1/18); Community Affairs (approved 2/8); Rules (approved 2/15). HB 513 (Bartleman) and SB 1326 (Rodriguez) would require the South Florida Water Management District to produce an annual report on the impact of sea-level rise and flood resiliency in Central and South Florida. It would extend the deadline for payments on bonds issued to fund acquisitions under the program from 2040 to 2054, allowing issuance of new 20-year bonds. As always, legislation that empowers citizens, conserves natural lands, protects and restores water quality and promotes water conservation, enhances community resilience, modernizes transportation, upholds home rule, and frees the Ocklawaha were among our highest priorities. SB 442 (Rodriguez) and HB 571 (Mooney) would authorize local land authorities to assist in administering grants for residential flood and sea-level rise mitigation projects, including grants for the elevation of structures above minimum flood elevations; the demolition and reconstruction of structures above minimum flood elevations; and the acquisition of land with structures at risk of flooding. House referrals: Environment, Agriculture & Flooding Subcommittee; Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee; State Affairs, Senate referrals: Environment & Natural Resources(approved 1/31); Governmental Oversight & Accountability; Appropriations. HB 201 (Daley) and SB 356 (Jones) would provide a sales tax exemption for energy efficient products designated with the Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) Energy Star label, and irrigation and household appliance water conserving products designated with the EPAs WaterSense label. HB 579 (Melo) and SB 1128 (Harrell) would have directed the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, in consultation with UF/IFAS & FGCU/Water School, to implement and study nutrient removal technologies and mechanical aquatic plant management techniques within Lake Okeechobee watershed. 2022-154), Judiciary Committee, Commerce Committee, McFarland, Died in Criminal Justice & Public Safety Subcommittee, Local Administration & Veterans Affairs Subcommittee, Gottlieb, Morales, Died in Ways & Means Committee; companion bill(s) passed, see CS/HB 7071 (Ch. Senate referrals: Environment & Natural Resources (approved 11/30); Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment, and General Government (approved 2/2); Appropriations (approved 2/28), House referrals: Environment, Agriculture & Flooding Subcommittee (approved 2/3); Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee (approved 2/14); State Affairs (approved 2/23) PASSED HOUSE 3/4 PASSED SENATE 3/4. While this bill did not pass, the program it calls for was included in the final budget and allocated $100 million. Other measures meant to protect the local environment or quality of life also could have invited lawsuits. Senate referrals: Environment and Natural Resources (approved 1/10); Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment, and General Government(approved 1/26); Appropriations, House referrals: Environment, Agriculture & Flooding Subcommittee (approved 1/12); Agriculture & Natural Resources Appropriations Subcommittee; State Affairs. SB 798 (Taddeo) and HB 473 (Casello) would have imposed a 12.5 cent per gallon excise tax on bottled water operators and deposited the proceeds into the wastewater and stormwater revolving loan trust fund. SB 832 (Stewart) and HB 561 (Goff-Marcil) would have required implementation of additional recommendations from the Governors Blue-Green Algae Task Force, including requiring septic tank inspections at least once every five years, prioritizing waterway clean-up plans (Basin Management Action Plans) with the greatest impact on water quality and requiring an assessment of BMAP cost-effectiveness. SB 228 (Rodriguez) and HB 101 (Fine) would have allowed property owners to apply for a Resiliency Energy Environment Florida (REEF) for funding a qualified improvements to their residential and non-residential property. Senate referrals; Environment & Natural Resources (approved 1/31); Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment & General Government (approved 2/22); Appropriations (approved 2/28), House referrals: Environment, Agriculture & Flooding Subcommittee (approved 2/3); Appropriations (approved 2/9); State Affairs (approved 2/23) PASSED BY HOUSE 3/2PASSED BY SENATE 3/9. House referrals: Tourism, Infrastructure & Energy Subcommittee(approved 2/15); Ways and Means, Senate referrals: Commerce & Tourism (approved 1/18); Finance & Tax(approved 2/3); Appropriations. Under these bills, the arborist or architect must document that the tree poses an unacceptable risk to persons or property, defined by industry practice as meaning removal is the only way to reduce its risk below moderate. PASSED BY HOUSE 3/4. SB 316 (Stewart) and HB 6025 (Eskamani) would have repealed the state preemption of tree trimming, pruning, and removal. SB 366 (Berman) and HB 81 (Eskamani) would have prohibited oil exploration, drilling or production on Florida land or in Florida waters; required that all electricity in the state be derived from renewable sources by 2040 and carbon emissions be reduced to net zero by 2050; created an advisory committee to reach these goals. HB 1377 (Roth) would set a minimum funding level of $350 million or 40 percent of the Land Acquisition Trust Fund for Florida Forever. Copyright 1997 - 2022 Florida House of Representatives All rights reserved. If a county decided to repair a deteriorated lateral line they could have used state or local funds allocated for environmental preservation or water quality protection. SB 882 (Brodeur) and HB 761 (Truenow) would require each water management district governing board, in cooperation with local governments, to develop a list of critical wetlands for acquisition using funds from the Land Acquisition Trust Fund. DEP would have worked with the state land planning agency and involved local governments to identify planning strategies to eliminate or mitigate adverse impacts and would have required the local government to modify proposed plans or plan amendments. Senate referrals: Judiciary (approved); Appropriations (approved 1/20). SB 1210 (Albritton) and HB 909 (Payne) would provide the Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection with exclusive decision-making authority over local pollution control programs evaluating pollutants and contaminants on agricultural lands that have been approved for conversion to nonagricultural use. HB 585 would have pushed back basin management action plan deadlines to 2024, and SB 1792 would have set a deadline of 2022. House referrals: Local Administration & Veterans Affairs Subcommittee; Ways & Means; State Affairs. PASSED HOUSE 3/2 PASSED SENATE 3/4. Both bills were amended to require the residential components of developments to include at least 10 percent affordable housing to qualify. Senate referrals: Community Affairs (approved 1/18); Environment and Natural Resources(approved 1/31); Rules, House referrals: Government Operations Subcommittee; Public Integrity & Elections; State Affairs. HB 6033 (Grieco) would have repealed the preemption to the state of the regulation of vacation rentals. Taxpayers would have paid the price if this bill had become law. SB 380 (Rodriguez) and HB 463 (Melo) would have prohibited state agencies from adopting or enforcing greenhouse gas emissions limits without legislative authorization.

Senate referrals: Environment & Natural Resources (Approved 11/30); Agriculture, Environment & General Government Appropriations (approved 1/12); Appropriations (approved 2/24). SB 320 (Stewart) and HB 6063 (Grieco) would have removed the state preemption of local home rule on disposable plastic bags, auxiliary containers, and wrappings. The House version would also hold the septic tank owner responsible for remediation if the inspection shows their system is not in compliance with regulations. SB 932 (Rodriguez) and HB 729 (Aloupis) would have required any comprehensive plan or plan amendment changes that apply to land within the Everglades Protection Area to follow the state coordinated review process and would have required the change to be reviewed by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for adverse impacts. SB 620 would have allowed businesses to sue governments over local ordinances if the business was at least three years old and could convince a court that a new law resulted or will result in a 15% loss of profit, even though many other factors can contribute to business losses. Senate referrals: Community Affairs; Environment and Natural Resources (approved 2/7); Rules (approved 2/15), House referrals: Professions & Public Health Subcommittee (approved 1/25); Environment, Agriculture & Flooding Subcommittee (approved 2/3); Health & Human Services (approved 2/17) PASSED BY HOUSE 2/24 PASSED BY SENATE 3/2. The bill also would have suspended any new ordinances if theywere challenged, and award successful challengers their legal costs if the ordinanceswere found to be arbitrary or unreasonable. This new option could have led to more seagrass destruction from development despite research showing high failure rates in projects to plant and restore seagrass. House referrals: Regulatory Reform Subcommittee; Ways & Means; Commerce, Senate referrals: Regulated Industries (approved 1/11); Community Affairs (approved 2/2); Rules. PASSED BY SENATE 2/17PASSED BY HOUSE 3/7, House referrals: Local Administration & Veterans Affairs Subcommittee (approved 1/19); Education & Employment (approved 2/9); State Affairs (approved 2/21). PASSED BY SENATE 2/17 PASSED BY HOUSE 3/8, House referrals: Environment, Agriculture & Flooding Subcommittee (approved 2/8); Appropriations(approved 2/17); State Affairs (approved 2/23). 2022-26), Died in Local Administration & Veterans Affairs Subcommittee, Judiciary Committee, Justice Appropriations Subcommittee, Criminal Justice & Public Safety Subcommittee, Killebrew, Laid on Table; companion bill(s) passed, see CS/SB 226 (Ch. The septic tank owner would be required to notify DEP prior to the scheduled inspection. The assessment would have included saltwater intrusion projections and the costs necessary to protect freshwater wellfields. The cap remained in SB 398. It would revise the Florida Forever funding formula. The bill would have also prohibited the adoption of small scale development amendments for properties located within or near the Everglades Protection Area. SB 1030 (Taddeo) and HB 681 (Rodriguez) would have expanded the area where impact fee credits for a development could be transferred to another development from an adjoining impact fee zone to the entire municipality or county. House referrals: Local Administration & Veterans Affairs Subcommittee (approved 1/19); Ways & Means (approved 1/31); State Affairs (approved 2/8). 2022-72), Laid on Table; companion bill(s) passed, see SM 302 (Adopted), Commerce Committee, Tourism, Infrastructure & Energy Subcommittee, Rizo, Laid on Table; companion bill(s) passed, see CS/CS/SB 364 (Ch. Amendments in the House bill removed the cap on public transportation projects. SB 224 was amended to remove the ban on smoking in state parks. HB 1285 (Hinson) and SB 1678 (Gibson) would have established an energy equity task force to develop a fair and equitable transition of this states energy infrastructure to renewable energy technologies within minority, underserved, rural, and low-income communities. The task forces responsibilities would have included recommending policies or legislation to ensure the equitable siting of renewable energy facilities within the state. HB 1019 (Duggan) and SB 1238 (Polsky) would have required each coastal county to conduct a vulnerability assessment of saltwater intrusion on the countys water supply and analyzed effects on water utility infrastructure, wellfield protection, and freshwater supply management. SB 1310 (Rodriguez) included similar provisions. The bills also provide that such mitigation paid by a developer, rather than being immediately directed toward a school capacity improvement, may be set aside and not spent until an appropriate improvement is identified.

HB 247 (Salzman) would have provided a tax credit of up to 20 percent of total eligible costs for rehabilitation of a certified historic structure and a tax credit of up to 30 percent of total eligible costs for rehabilitation of a certified historic structure that is physically located within the official district boundaries of an active, certified Florida Main Street community.